Skip to main content


scl_faq

Are There Other Contact Lens Alternatives 1280×480

Home »

Are There Other Contact Lens Alternatives?

Several eye conditions and diseases can make it hard, even impossible, to wear standard contact lenses. For patients who suffer from these conditions, achieving clear vision can be difficult. That’s where scleral contact lenses and other specialty contact lenses come in.

Below you’ll find information about some of the other contact lenses we offer that are suitable for hard-to-fit eyes. Please contact us if you think any of these options would be suitable for you, or if your current lenses are giving you any trouble.

Our practice serves patients from Costa Mesa, Orange County, Newport Beach, and Irvine, California and surrounding communities.
Book An Appointment
Call Us 714-500-7564
Learn More About Scleral Lenses
eye pain Thumbnail.jpg

Corneal Disease and Scleral Lenses

What are Scleral Lenses Thumbnail 1.jpg

What are Scleral Lenses?

Scleral Lenses for Keratoconus Thumbnail.jpg

Scleral Lenses for Keratoconus

beautiful eyes1.jpg

Who Wears Scleral Lenses?

tips and researches Thumbnail.jpg

Tips and Resources

Read Our Latest Posts
Everything You Need To Know About Keratoconus 640×350 11.jpg

Everything You Need To Know About Keratoconus

Scleral Lenses 4 Facts You Should Know 640×350 1.jpg

4 Facts You Should Know About Scleral Lenses

Are Contact Lenses Not Working for You 640×350 1.jpg

Regular Contact Lenses Not Working for You? Consider Scleral Lenses

Stay Active and See Better With Scleral Lenses 640×350 1.jpg

Stay Active and See Better With Scleral Lenses

Types of Astigmatism And Correction Options 1280×480

Home »

Types of Astigmatism And How They Can Be Corrected

Astigmatism is a type of refractive error characterized by an irregularly shaped or non-spherical cornea, the outer front surface of the eye. Although this condition may sound concerning, it’s relatively common, affecting approximately 1 in 3 individuals around the world.

Additionally, astigmatism doesn’t affect the health of the eye, but rather how the eye focuses light onto the retina.

A perfectly spherical cornea refracts all the light entering the eye with the same focusing power, so there is one focal point within the eye. An astigmatic eye, on the other hand, has two different refracting powers of light, so there are two focal points within the eye that affects visual clarity.

Most people with astigmatism also have other refractive errors, like myopia (nearsightedness) or hyperopia (farsightedness).

The hallmark symptoms of astigmatism are:

  • Blurred vision (both near and far distances)
  • Difficulty with night vision
  • Irritated eyes
  • Frequent eye strain
  • Headaches

There are 3 types of astigmatism and several ways to correct this refractive problem.

Types of Astigmatism

The 3 main classifications of astigmatism are based on the principal meridian of each eye. Think of the eye’s meridian as a plane or axis of the eye — for example, the horizontal meridian and vertical meridian.

When the horizontal axis is steeper than the vertical, it creates a stronger focusing power in the horizontal meridian. The difference in the focusing powers results in two different focal points on the retina and the blurry vision associated with astigmatism.

1. Myopic Astigmatism

When one or both of the eye’s principal meridians is myopic (focuses light in front of the retina), the result is myopic astigmatism. There are 2 subdivisions of myopic astigmatism:

  • Simple myopic astigmatism: when incoming light creates 2 focal points — one in front of the retina and one in the correct position — directly on the retina.
  • Compound myopic astigmatism: when the 2 focal points are both in front of the retina, and in separate locations.

Examples of this type of astigmatism as they appear on the optometrist’s prescription are plano /-2.00 x 180 or -2.25 / -1.00 x 90.

2. Hyperopic Astigmatism

Hyperopic astigmatism occurs when both or one principal meridian is farsighted (focuses light behind the retina).

This type of astigmatism is also divided into 2 types:

  • Simple hyperopic astigmatism: when one focal point lands correctly and directly on the retina, and another virtual focal point sits beyond the retina.
  • Compound hyperopic astigmatism: when both focal points are 2 separate virtual locations behind the retina.

Examples of this type of astigmatism as they appear on the optometrist’s prescription are +2.00 /-2.00 x 180 or +3.25 / -1.00 x 90.

3. Mixed Astigmatism

Mixed astigmatism is when one principal meridian is farsighted (beyond the retina) and the other is nearsighted (in front of the retina).

Regular vs. Irregular

Another way to classify astigmatism is regular vs. irregular. Regular astigmatism is when the principal meridians are either horizontal or vertical meridians, and irregular astigmatism occurs when the principal meridians are not at the horizontal or vertical angles, such as 135 or 45 degrees.

Examples of this type of astigmatism as they appear on the optometrist’s prescription are: +2.00 /-2.00 x 135 or +3.25 / -1.00 x 45

Ways to Correct Astigmatism

Whether you have myopic, hyperopic or mixed astigmatism, your vision will be blurred. The degree of blurred vision will vary from patient to patient. Your optometrist will recommend the most suitable corrective method for your eyes.

For people with mild to moderate astigmatism, prescription lenses in the form of glasses or standard contact lenses do a fine job of correcting the refractive error.

Another option for correcting astigmatism is through refractive surgery; however, this choice is less popular due to the possible complications of surgery.

For patients with high levels of astigmatism, standard contact lenses usually aren’t an option due to the highly irregularly-shaped cornea. Instead, scleral contact lenses are a safe, comfortable and effective way to correct vision for hard-to-fit eyes.

Why are Scleral Lenses Optimal For Astigmatic Eyes?

Scleral lenses have a larger diameter than standard soft lenses. The large lens vaults over the cornea and sits on the sclera (the white of the eye) with a nourishing reservoir of fluid in between the lens and the cornea.

The customized scleral lens acts as an artificial cornea, creating a new corneal shape that refracts light correctly for clear and comfortable vision all day long.

Scleral lenses are made of high-quality material and maintain a rigid shape, so the lens remains stable, no matter the degree of astigmatism.

What’s more, many optometrists prescribe sclerals to their patients with corneal abnormalities as a therapeutic tool in post-surgery patients.

Scleral contact lenses provide crisper and more stable vision than standard soft lenses, in addition to offering a continuously nourishing and breathable environment for the cornea.

How We Can Help

Our knowledgeable and experienced eye care team is trained to fit all types of patients with scleral lenses. Our goal is to provide each patient with crisp and comfortable vision, no matter their level of astigmatism or corneal abnormality.

Our optometry clinic has the latest diagnostic technology to provide you with the most efficient and accurate eye exam.

To schedule a consultation with Dr. David Yoo & Dr. Daniel Quon, contact South Coast Optometry today.

Our practice serves patients from Costa Mesa, Orange County, Newport Beach, and Irvine, California and surrounding communities.
Book An Appointment
Call Us 714-500-7564
Learn More About Scleral Lenses
eye pain Thumbnail.jpg

Corneal Disease and Scleral Lenses

What are Scleral Lenses Thumbnail 1.jpg

What are Scleral Lenses?

Scleral Lenses for Keratoconus Thumbnail.jpg

Scleral Lenses for Keratoconus

beautiful eyes1.jpg

Who Wears Scleral Lenses?

tips and researches Thumbnail.jpg

Tips and Resources

Read Our Latest Posts
Everything You Need To Know About Keratoconus 640×350 11.jpg

Everything You Need To Know About Keratoconus

Scleral Lenses 4 Facts You Should Know 640×350 1.jpg

4 Facts You Should Know About Scleral Lenses

Are Contact Lenses Not Working for You 640×350 1.jpg

Regular Contact Lenses Not Working for You? Consider Scleral Lenses

Stay Active and See Better With Scleral Lenses 640×350 1.jpg

Stay Active and See Better With Scleral Lenses

Young Woman Smiling 1280×480

Home »

Where Do Scleral Lenses Fit In Your Dry Eye Treatment Protocol?

Dry Eye Syndrome (DES) is among the top drivers that lead patients to seek help from eye care professionals trained in treating dry eyes.

Dry Eye Syndrome (DES) is a highly common condition that occurs when your tear glands don’t produce enough tears or when your tears evaporate too quickly. This condition can be temporary or chronic and is characterized by dry, itchy, stinging and irritated eyes.

Curiously, a recent survey revealed that out of the more than 30 million adults who have symptoms of Dry Eye, only half of those are diagnosed and an even smaller number receives the medical attention they need. These numbers are a concern since there are millions of people needlessly suffering from a treatable condition.

If you’re suffering from dry eye, contact South Coast Optometry today. We offer effective and lasting treatments that are sure to improve your quality of life.

Signs and Symptoms of Dry Eye Disease

Dry eyes can be caused by several factors, such as aging, medication, environmental changes, hormonal changes, allergies, among others. The most common ocular signs and symptoms include:

  • Crusty eyelids
  • Dryness
  • Grittiness
  • Itchy eyes
  • Redness
  • Stinging
  • Tearing
  • Blurred vision
  • Burning
  • Intense eye pain
  • Photophobia (sensitivity to light)
  • Sensation of something stuck in the eye

How Can Scleral Lenses Help With Dry Eye?

Scleral lenses are customized rigid lenses that tackle three factors simultaneously: they provide vision correction, they protect the eye and serve a therapeutic purpose by lubricating the eye.

Due to their large shape, unique features and customized fitting, scleral lenses offer an excellent solution for dry eyes. They decrease pain, discomfort, eye redness and itchiness in those with dry eyes.

While scleral lenses can provide relief to patients suffering from DES, the question is deciding on the right time to incorporate scleral lenses into a dry eye treatment plan.

Scleral lenses should not be the primary treatment method

Despite their countless benefits, scleral lenses should not be the primary therapy or treatment method for patients with mild to moderate dry eye syndrome. Eye practitioners often advise to try out prior treatment options first.

Additional Dry Eye treatment methods include:

  • Environment modifications
  • Improved eyelid hygiene
  • Nighttime goggles
  • Nighttime eye lubrication
  • Prescription dry eye medications
  • Preservative-free eyedrops

Scleral contact lenses as a tertiary therapy

Scleral lenses should only serve as tertiary therapy after overnight treatment options and prescription medications such as moisture goggles or ointment have been exhausted. That said, scleral lenses should be incorporated before the long-term use of steroids, surgical punctual occlusion and] amniotic membrane grafts.

Some of the other tertiary therapies that can be recommended alongside scleral lenses include:

  • Autologous/allogeneic serum eye drops
  • Oral secretagogues
  • Soft bandage contact lenses

Like scleral lenses, these treatment procedures are highly effective, but should only be used if the primary and secondary therapies fail to improve the patient’s Dry Eye condition.

If you experience any eye pain or regular ocular discomfort, book your appointment with South Coast Optometry today.

Our practice serves patients from Costa Mesa, Orange County, Newport Beach, and Irvine, California and surrounding communities.
Book An Appointment
Call Us 714-500-7564
Learn More About Scleral Lenses
eye pain Thumbnail.jpg

Corneal Disease and Scleral Lenses

What are Scleral Lenses Thumbnail 1.jpg

What are Scleral Lenses?

Scleral Lenses for Keratoconus Thumbnail.jpg

Scleral Lenses for Keratoconus

beautiful eyes1.jpg

Who Wears Scleral Lenses?

tips and researches Thumbnail.jpg

Tips and Resources

Read Our Latest Posts
Everything You Need To Know About Keratoconus 640×350 11.jpg

Everything You Need To Know About Keratoconus

Scleral Lenses 4 Facts You Should Know 640×350 1.jpg

4 Facts You Should Know About Scleral Lenses

Are Contact Lenses Not Working for You 640×350 1.jpg

Regular Contact Lenses Not Working for You? Consider Scleral Lenses

Stay Active and See Better With Scleral Lenses 640×350 1.jpg

Stay Active and See Better With Scleral Lenses

Woman and Child Looking up Keratoconus Myths | South Coast Optometry

Home »

Keratoconus Myths & Misconceptions

Keratoconus is a serious eye condition that progressively changes the shape of the cornea and causes it to thin and bulge. This eye condition can alter your vision to the point that it interferes with your day-to-day life.

There are many myths and misconceptions around keratoconus and its treatment. Find out the truth about keratoconus before starting any treatment for the condition.

Myth: Keratoconus results in blindness

Truth: While keratoconus changes the shape of the cornea to the extent that vision may deteriorate, it does not cause total blindness. However, keratoconus can cause significant vision loss that could make it difficult to perform regular activities.

Myth: Contact lenses can prevent the progression of keratoconus

Truth: There is a misconception that once a patient starts wearing contact lenses, the progression of keratoconus will stop. This is not true. While contact lenses improve visual clarity, they do not offer a permanent solution for keratoconus. Also, contact lenses that are poorly fitted may worsen the condition.

Myth: Only young people are diagnosed with keratoconus

Truth: While keratoconus usually develops in people under the age of 30, some people are diagnosed in their 40s and 50s.

Now that you know the truth about keratoconus, contact South Coast Optometry to discuss the best way to manage the condition.

Our practice serves patients from Costa Mesa, Orange County, Newport Beach, and Irvine, California and surrounding communities.
Book An Appointment
Call Us 714-500-7564
Learn More About Scleral Lenses
eye pain Thumbnail.jpg

Corneal Disease and Scleral Lenses

What are Scleral Lenses Thumbnail 1.jpg

What are Scleral Lenses?

Scleral Lenses for Keratoconus Thumbnail.jpg

Scleral Lenses for Keratoconus

beautiful eyes1.jpg

Who Wears Scleral Lenses?

tips and researches Thumbnail.jpg

Tips and Resources

Read Our Latest Posts
Everything You Need To Know About Keratoconus 640×350 11.jpg

Everything You Need To Know About Keratoconus

Scleral Lenses 4 Facts You Should Know 640×350 1.jpg

4 Facts You Should Know About Scleral Lenses

Are Contact Lenses Not Working for You 640×350 1.jpg

Regular Contact Lenses Not Working for You? Consider Scleral Lenses

Stay Active and See Better With Scleral Lenses 640×350 1.jpg

Stay Active and See Better With Scleral Lenses

Treatments for Keratoconus hero

Home »

Treatments for Keratoconus

What is Keratoconus?

Keratoconus (KC) is an eye condition in which the cornea weakens and thins over time, causing the development of a cone-like bulge and optical irregularity of the cornea. This condition occurs in approximately 1 in 2,000 individuals.

Keratoconus typically begins to affect people in their late teens or early twenties, and may progress for 10-20 years before slowing or stabilizing. Each eye is affected differently. In the early stages of keratoconus, you might experience mildly blurred vision, difficulty seeing at night, frequent headaches, an increased sensitivity to light, and the need to frequently change your eyeglass prescription.

During later stages of keratoconus, you may experience higher levels of blurry and distorted vision, an increase of nearsightedness or astigmatism, or be unable to wear contact lenses, as they will no longer fit properly, no longer provide clear vision and be uncomfortable.

Keratoconus Treatments

There are a variety of treatment options for keratoconus, including rigid gas permeable (RGP) contact lenses, scleral contact lenses, intracorneal ring segment implants and more. Learn about these options below.

Eyeglasses or Soft Contact Lenses

Wearing prescription lenses improves your vision because the lenses bend rays of light to focus images on the retina inside your eye. The cornea is the clear dome-shaped part of the front of the eye and is responsible for the majority of the focusing power of the eye. However, as keratoconus progresses, the cornea becomes more irregularly shaped and stronger optical lenses are required for clear vision.

Even though eyeglasses and soft contact lenses may help correct refractive errors like nearsightedness and farsightedness, some vision issues associated with keratoconus may still persist due to the irregular corneal shape, such as light sensitivity or discomfort.

Customized Contact Lenses (RGP, Scleral, Hybrid)

Rigid gas permeable (RGP) contact lenses and custom-fit scleral contact lenses create a smooth, uniform surface, allowing the light to be clearly focused. A saline solution fills in the space between the rigid lens and the cornea, “masking” the irregular corneal shape. Contact lens fittings may become more challenging as keratoconus becomes more advanced.

Scleral contact lenses in particular help with keratoconus because the lens creates a dome over the irregular cornea and functions as the new refractive surface of the eye. They are preferred by most eye doctors who provide custom-fit contact lenses because of their superior comfort & versatility.

Corneal Cross-Linking (CXL)

This minimally invasive procedure uses Riboflavin eye drops plus UVA light to slow keratoconus progression. Riboflavin eye drops are activated with UVA light to create additional cross-link bonds in the cornea, making it stiffer. CXL does not restore vision that has already been lost and does not eliminate the need for glasses or contact lenses. But it can help limit the progression of keratoconus.

Intracorneal Ring Segments (ICRS)

These specifically designed implants are made of medical plastic that are surgically placed under the surface of the cornea to help improve the corneal shape. The ICRS are implanted into the cornea to flatten the steep part of the cone into a more regular shape. This surgery does not slow keratoconus progression and glasses or contact lenses are usually still needed.

Corneal Transplant Surgery

This surgery replaces part of the cornea with donor tissue to improve corneal shape and/or clarity. The irregular or scarred corneal tissue is replaced with donor tissue from a cornea without keratoconus. Corneal transplant surgery is usually reserved for advanced cases, when the patient can no longer tolerate contact lenses or vision is severely compromised.

If you are concerned you may have keratoconus, reach out to South Coast Optometry today. We can help. With expert experience and a deep understanding of keratoconus, we can recommend the treatment option that is best for you in order to maximize your comfort and ensure you have clear, consistent vision.

Our practice serves patients from Costa Mesa, Orange County, Newport Beach, and Irvine, California and surrounding communities.
Book An Appointment
Call Us 714-500-7564
Learn More About Scleral Lenses
eye pain Thumbnail.jpg

Corneal Disease and Scleral Lenses

What are Scleral Lenses Thumbnail 1.jpg

What are Scleral Lenses?

Scleral Lenses for Keratoconus Thumbnail.jpg

Scleral Lenses for Keratoconus

beautiful eyes1.jpg

Who Wears Scleral Lenses?

tips and researches Thumbnail.jpg

Tips and Resources

Read Our Latest Posts
Everything You Need To Know About Keratoconus 640×350 11.jpg

Everything You Need To Know About Keratoconus

Scleral Lenses 4 Facts You Should Know 640×350 1.jpg

4 Facts You Should Know About Scleral Lenses

Are Contact Lenses Not Working for You 640×350 1.jpg

Regular Contact Lenses Not Working for You? Consider Scleral Lenses

Stay Active and See Better With Scleral Lenses 640×350 1.jpg

Stay Active and See Better With Scleral Lenses

Specialty Contact Lens Fittings

Home »

Why Health Professionals Refer Patients To Us For Customized Contact Lens Fittings

South Coast Optometry is a contact lens practice that continues to develop great relationships with other practitioners around the Costa Mesa area. We work with corneal specialists and other physicians to offer a continuum of care for their patients with corneal irregularities by providing advanced custom contact lens fittings, even for the most hard-to-fit patients.

Our training and expertise in the area of scleral and other custom-fit contact lenses is the primary reason that other healthcare professionals refer to our practice.

We’re Here For Your Patients

The health care professionals you choose to refer your patients to matters.

You want your patients to visit a practice where they’re offered world-class eye care, professionalism and empathy. That’s why we do the utmost to ensure a quality experience for all of the patients you refer.

We know that patients want to be heard. We set aside time to discuss and evaluate their needs.

Your patients deserve safe and effective treatment, which is why the treatment we provide is evidence-based and utilizes the most advanced technology — all with utmost professionalism and care.

List of Common Corneal Conditions

We evaluate, diagnose and recommend treatment for all types of corneal conditions, including:

  • Keratoconus/Keratoglobus
  • Post LASIK/RK/PRK Ectasia
  • Post PK/INTACS/DMEK/DALK/DSAEK, etc.
  • Post Corneal Cross Linking
  • Corneal Dystrophies, such as Fuchs’ and Map-dot-fingertip corneal dystrophy
  • Severe Ocular Surface Disease (OSD)
  • Aniridia, ICE Syndromes and Trauma
  • Corneal Scarring

man cute eyes smiling 640

Why Scleral Contact Lenses?

The many benefits of scleral lenses render them a popular and satisfying choice for patients with corneal irregularities who desire clear and comfortable vision.

Custom-designed scleral lenses help patients with a range of corneal conditions achieve dramatic improvements in visual acuity and comfort. The lenses’ oxygen-permeable and fluid-filled chamber protects the eye while providing the moisture and oxygen it needs to stay healthy. This makes scleral lenses the best choice for promoting corneal healing.

Case Studies

Here are a few examples showing the typical patient presentations and the successful outcomes.

*These patient testimonials are meant to reflect actual testimonials of patients but not necessarily our patients.

Post Corneal Graft

Patients with keratoconus or corneal transplants can see clearly by wearing scleral contact lenses; they are the safest and best way to correct vision for irregular astigmatism. Following a corneal transplant, the cornea should not come in contact with a contact lens. This makes scleral lenses the optimal solution, as they vault over the cornea without touching it directly.

John came to our practice seeking a solution for his keratoconus, which affected both of his eyes. He had recently undergone a corneal transplant and had a corneal graft for his keratoconus.

In order to improve John’s visual acuity, we did the following:

We took a topography reading of 11,000 points on each cornea and then designed the lens to individually match all 11,000 points of the patient’s corneas. Because he had a corneal transplant, it was crucial that the lens not touch any part of the graft to ensure maximum comfort.

OCT images were used to measure the clearance in microns, between the back surface of the scleral lens and the front surface of the cornea. This maintains a healthy graft while wearing the contact lenses.

As a result, John was able to achieve 20/25 vision in both eyes. He now has clear, comfortable vision all day and is very pleased with his scleral lenses.

Post LASIK Complications

While LASIK surgery has a high success rate, some patients come out of the surgery with imperfect vision.

Debbi’s primary concern was the reduced visual acuity following refractive laser surgery.

Unfortunately, her post-LASIK resulted in sub-optimal vision. Her LASIK surgeon recommended an enhancement procedure to improve her vision, which led her to undergo subsequent LASIK surgeries. Unfortunately, these attempts left her with extremely poor vision in each eye, and Debbi was desperate to find a solution to her vision problems.

Debbi arrived at our practice after hearing that we specialize in helping people achieve clear vision following poor LASIK results. A comprehensive eye exam found that Debbi’s eyes had a very high prescription and irregular astigmatism following her surgery.

Her best option was to wear scleral lenses as they would correct her astigmatism and farsightedness and were perfectly safe for her corneas, which after multiple surgeries, were scarred.

Since getting fitted for her custom-designed scleral lenses, Debbi is thrilled with how sharp and comfortable her vision has become.

Post-Radial Keratotomy Surgery Complications

Many patients underwent radial keratotomy (RK) surgery to correct myopia and astigmatism during the early days of refractive surgery. Such patients sometimes experienced some refractive error in the form of nearsightedness, farsightedness, or irregular astigmatism. Those with irregular astigmatism experience blurred, distorted vision that cannot be corrected with glasses. These are among the more serious and frequently occurring complications following corneal refractive surgery.

Matthew, a 52-year-old teacher, underwent bilateral RK surgery in 1995. Though the initial results were positive, within two years his vision deteriorated. He developed corneal ectasia, and complained of blurred vision, discomfort and red eyes when wearing contact lenses.

The slit-lamp examination revealed damaged corneas that had severe staining along the incision lines and around the cornea at the limbus. This was a result of the fit of the GP lenses he was wearing at the time. These lenses were touching the anterior elevations of the cornea and did not allow for enough tear exchange.

Fitting a scleral lens was the best option to treat Matthew’s damaged corneas, alleviate discomfort and improve his vision.

At the one-year visit the patient had improved visual acuity and quality. The fitting of a well-designed semi-scleral GP contact lens filled with a saline solution created a healthy environment behind the lens, which in turn allowed the cornea and limbus to heal. The scleral lenses also helped protect the RK incisions from further abrasions caused by blinking.

As this case demonstrates, patients who developed irregular corneal surfaces following refractive surgery can benefit from a customized scleral contact lens designed to improve their wearing comfort and vision.

Who We Work With

We work with many practitioners including:

  • Family doctors
  • Local hospitals
  • Optometrists
  • Ophthalmologists
  • Corneal specialists

Feel free to contact us for more information or with any inquiries. We look forward to providing your referred patients with world-class eye care.

Our practice serves patients from Costa Mesa, Orange County, Newport Beach, and Irvine, California and surrounding communities.
Book An Appointment
Call Us 714-500-7564