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Teens & Contacts

Oh, the pressure! Get great grades, excel in at least one sport, play a musical instrument, work part-time, hang out with friends — and always, always look cool. If you’re a teenager today, much is expected.

But what to do if suddenly you can’t make out the writing on the blackboard, you can’t see the ball until it’s practically in your hands, or you have to squint to read the notes? What to do — and still look cool?


Try contact lenses. Not that glasses can’t be fashionable. But for today’s active teenagers, contacts are a perfect fit. What your parents may not know is that today’s lenses are more comfortable and easier to care for than those of a decade ago. Plus, there are more types of contacts, from disposables to toric (especially for people with astigmatism), from which to choose. In other words, there are almost certainly lenses to fit your individual needs.


When can you begin wearing contact lenses?
Even pre-teens can handle contacts. A three-year study* conducted by the Indiana University School of Optometry found children ages 11-13 able to handle contacts well and understand the use of their care systems to maintain clean, comfortable lenses. When to begin contact lens wear can only be determined in conjunction with your eye care practitioner.


What are the advantages of contact lenses over eyeglasses? Glasses can get in the way, especially in sports, cheerleading, dance or other exercise. Not contact lenses. Nor are there rims to interfere with your side, or peripheral, vision.


When you’re active, contact lenses don’t steam up or slide down your nose. Plus, they eliminate that annoying pressure behind your ears.


“Will Young Children Comply and Follow Instructions to Successfully Wear Soft Contact Lenses?”
by P.S. Soni, D.G. Horner, L. Jimenenz, J. Ross, J. Rounds; CLAO Journal, April 1995.)


Fiction or fact? Truths about contact lenses
FICTION: Teen eyes are not “mature enough” for contacts.
FACT: Most eye care professionals agree that by age 13, even as early as age 11, most eyes are developed enough for contact lenses. An eye exam will confirm whether contacts can be worn or not.


FICTION: Contacts fall out a lot.
FACT: They fell out more often when the only ones available were hard lenses. Soft lenses conform to the shape of the eye, are larger in diameter and are tucked under the eyelids, so they usually don’t move out of place or fall out. Plus, they’re usually more stable than glasses, especially for sports.


FICTION: Contact lenses are expensive.
FACT: Not! The price of contact lenses is comparable to that of an average pair of eyeglasses.


FICTION: Contact lenses are hard to care for.
FACT: Not at all. Today’s lens care systems are easy and quick to use. Contacts can be ready to wear in just five minutes.


FICTION: Contact lenses are not safe to wear for sports.
FACT: Except for water sports, contacts are very safe. They can’t be broken or knocked off the face and they provide unobstructed peripheral vision.


Ask your parents to make an appointment to assess your ability to wear contacts. If he or she gives thumbs-up, then try a pair. Wearing lenses is the best way to find out if you and contact lenses were made for each other.

SOUTH COAST OPTOMETRY UPDATE – JULY 1, 2020

COVID-19 has been and continues to be an ongoing trial for all of us. During this unforeseen time, we ask kindly for your understanding and compliance to the CDC guidelines. In order to decrease the chances of contraction, we are allowing only one parent to accompany their child during the examination. We appreciate your patience and understanding.

We also want to inform you of the new additional symptoms of COVID-19 that have been added to the previous symptoms as potential indicators of having COVID-19:

New symptoms:             Congestion/runny nose
                                           Nausea
                                           Diarrhea

Previous symptoms:       Headache
                                            Fever/chills
                                            Dry cough
                                            Shortness of breath
                                            Fatigue
                                            Sore throat
                                            Muscle/body aches
                                            New loss of taste or smell

Please be aware that a person does not have to have all of these symptoms but anyone or multiple symptoms can be an indicator of having COVID-19. If you or any family members are experiencing any of the above symptoms, we kindly ask that you reschedule your appointment and contact yourprimary care provider. It is best to reschedule your appointment with us after being symptom-free for14 days.

We at South Coast Optometry truly appreciate each and every one of you as a person and value your trust in us to take care of your most precious eyes. As always, we will continue to closely monitor the COVID-19 situation and communicate any and all changes through our website,
www.SouthCoastOptometry.com. Again, we truly appreciate your understanding and support during this unprecedented time and look forward to seeing everyone soon!

Sincerely,

Dr. Daniel E. Quon, O.D., and The Entire South Coast Optometry Team!!!

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Until further notice, we are only seeing essential care patients. Our hours are:
Monday: 10:00 AM to 7:00PM
Tuesday: Closed
Wednesday: 10:00 AM to 7:00 PM
Thursday: 9:00 AM to 6:00 PM
Friday: 10:00AM to 6:00 PM
Saturday: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

We now offer TeleHealth consultations, Call (714) 540-2020 to schedule a time
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