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Myopia

If you can see objects nearby with no problem, but reading road signs or making out the writing on the board at school is more difficult, you may be near- or shortsighted.


This condition is known as myopia, a term that comes from a Greek word meaning “closed eyes.” Myopia is not a disease, nor does it mean that you have “bad eyes.” It simply refers to a variation in the shape of your eyeball. The degree of variation determines whether or not you will need corrective eyewear.


What causes nearsightedness?
Myopia most often occurs because the eyeball is too long, rather than the normal, more rounded shape. Another less frequent cause of myopia is that the cornea, the eye’s clear outer window, is too curved. There is some evidence that nearsightedness may also be caused by too much close vision work.


How does myopia affect sight?
Our ability to “see” starts when light enters the eye through the cornea. The shape of the cornea, lens and eyeball help bend (refract) light rays in such a manner that light is focused into a point precisely on the retina.


In contrast, if you are nearsighted, the light rays from a distant point are focused at a place in front of the retina. As the light will only be focused in that one place, by the time it reaches the retina it will have “defocused” again, forming a blurred image.


Myopia usually occurs between the ages of 8 to 12 years. Since the eyes continue to grow during childhood, nearsightedness almost always occurs before the age of 20. Often the degree of myopia increases as the body grows rapidly, then levels off in adulthood. During the years of rapid growth, frequent changes in prescription eyewear may be needed to maintain clear vision. It is important to bear in mind that the frequent changes in prescription are not making the eyes “weaker”. During the growth period that occurs during the teen years the eye is also growing rapidly and hence the degree of blur is also increasing. As the growth cycle slows the prescription changes slow correspondingly.


How is myopia diagnosed and treated?
Myopia is often suspected when a teacher notices a child squinting to see a blackboard or a child performs poorly during a routine eye screening. Further examination will reveal the degree of the problem.


A comprehensive eye examination will detect myopia. Periodic examinations should follow after myopia has been discovered to determine whether the condition is changing, and whether a change in prescriptive eyewear is needed. Eye exams also help to ensure that vision impairments do not interfere with daily activities.


Corrective concave (minus) lenses are prescribed to help focus light more precisely on the retina, where a clear image will be formed.


Depending on the degree of myopia, glasses or contact lenses may be needed all of the time for clear vision. If the degree of impairment is slight, corrective lenses may be needed only for activities that require distance vision, such as driving, watching TV or in sports requiring fine vision.


Nearsightedness in children:
School age children may have vision problems ranging from mild to severe. When problems are suspected, it is important that the child have a comprehensive eye health examination to determine the nature of the problem and to rule out serious eye diseases. When vision conditions are treated properly, the child will enjoy the best possible sight.


To help a child cope with nearsightedness:



  • Avoid referring to the child’s eyes as “bad eyes;” instead tell the child that his or her eyes just bend light differently and corrective lenses are needed to help focus light rays.
  • Ensure that they understand that nearsightedness rarely disappears and that wearing spectacles may be necessary in the long-term, but that this is not a disease.
  • Use illustrations and simple explanations to help the child understand how a differently-shaped eyeball may result in his or her being nearsighted.
  • Make the occasion of selecting new frames for lenses a fun time.
  • Consider contact lenses as an option.
  • Do not restrict the child’s activities because of poor vision.
  • Include the child in discussions about his or her eyesight. Encourage the child to verbalize concerns about the adjustment to rapidly changing vision.

SOUTH COAST OPTOMETRY UPDATE – JULY 1, 2020

COVID-19 has been and continues to be an ongoing trial for all of us. During this unforeseen time, we ask kindly for your understanding and compliance to the CDC guidelines. In order to decrease the chances of contraction, we are allowing only one parent to accompany their child during the examination. We appreciate your patience and understanding.

We also want to inform you of the new additional symptoms of COVID-19 that have been added to the previous symptoms as potential indicators of having COVID-19:

New symptoms:             Congestion/runny nose
                                           Nausea
                                           Diarrhea

Previous symptoms:       Headache
                                            Fever/chills
                                            Dry cough
                                            Shortness of breath
                                            Fatigue
                                            Sore throat
                                            Muscle/body aches
                                            New loss of taste or smell

Please be aware that a person does not have to have all of these symptoms but anyone or multiple symptoms can be an indicator of having COVID-19. If you or any family members are experiencing any of the above symptoms, we kindly ask that you reschedule your appointment and contact yourprimary care provider. It is best to reschedule your appointment with us after being symptom-free for14 days.

We at South Coast Optometry truly appreciate each and every one of you as a person and value your trust in us to take care of your most precious eyes. As always, we will continue to closely monitor the COVID-19 situation and communicate any and all changes through our website,
www.SouthCoastOptometry.com. Again, we truly appreciate your understanding and support during this unprecedented time and look forward to seeing everyone soon!

Sincerely,

Dr. Daniel E. Quon, O.D., and The Entire South Coast Optometry Team!!!

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Until further notice, we are only seeing essential care patients. Our hours are:
Monday: 10:00 AM to 7:00PM
Tuesday: Closed
Wednesday: 10:00 AM to 7:00 PM
Thursday: 9:00 AM to 6:00 PM
Friday: 10:00AM to 6:00 PM
Saturday: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

We now offer TeleHealth consultations, Call (714) 540-2020 to schedule a time
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